Beck Lombardi

Music & Lenses

Beck Lombardi

Just being people in a room together, listening and spending time together and being bound by nothing but a beat. That’s a truly human experience.

"Watching people sing lyrics that I wrote, identifying with feelings that I’ve felt and enjoyed the music that we’ve written, it’s a connection like nothing else"

Music has always been something that has affected me and inspired me. My parents separated when I was quite young and I moved away from the south for a good few years. The school Summer holidays were split in half by a car ride and trade-off between them at motorway services, where I would go from Ibiza and Euphoria classics with my mum to Motown and Rhythm and Blues with my dad. 

Somehow in the middle of that, I found Rock, from Journey to My Chemical Romance, Linkin Park and TwentyOnePilots, I loved the drama. I needed an outlet and I found it, there is nothing in this world that can convey an indescribable emotion as music can.

I live with depression and anxiety among other mental health issues and when you spend so much time in that battlefield inside your head, it’s amazing when you can find something that completely takes you out of that. The lights go down, the smoke chokes out the machine and the audience goes quiet. I find the truest, barest version of myself there, before my mouth opens, just looking out at people and knowing that they’re in your hands. Controlling a crowd with music helped me learn how to control all of the parts of me that seem wild. 

Biggest musical influence? 

Maybe people would expect me to say somebody with an incredibly technical, traditional voice, maybe not. But there are two standout vocalists that really changed my life and the way I 

thought about performance. Tyler Joseph, lead singer of twentyonepilots taught me that it’s okay to let your body move in the way that you feel, it’s okay for your voice to go with whatever emotion you’re feeling, you don’t have to be pitch-perfect, you will find your best performance at the moment. Chester Bennington taught me that putting your soul on paper and into words and music can be incredibly difficult but ultimately it is not worth making anything if it is not true. His loss was the real push for me to keep going. You never know what’s going to happen to you, so make every moment count. 

What’s your favorite part about playing live? 

Watching people sing lyrics that I wrote, identifying with feelings that I’ve felt and enjoyed the music that we’ve written, it’s a connection like nothing else. Just being people in a room together, listening and spending time together and being bound by nothing but a beat. That’s a truly human experience. 

Biggest fuck up playing live? 

I’d probably say that I spent the majority of my young career messing up. I used to play open mic around the south coast all the time, always finishing my sets with a cover of Chaka Khan’s “Aint Nobody” and for some reason, I always blanked on the second verse. I was playing a show in Gosport once and I blanked so hard that I wasted about five minutes of the set. It was at that point that I stopped writing lyrics down, relying on something else and getting too caught up in making something perfect ruined my rapport with the crowd. That’s the most important thing.